Sense and sensibility 2008 ending a relationship

John Willoughby - Wikipedia

sense and sensibility 2008 ending a relationship

What is it about the ending that a lot of people don't like? Personally (after seeing the Thread: The Sense & Sensibility ending . Join Date: Nov ; Location: USA; Posts: Marianne's Sensible Marriage. I have heard. To close my discussion on the adaptation of Sense and Sensibility into film, as for example Sense and Sensibility () by John Alexander and Andrew Davies . Marianne that [her] marriage would have been poorly supported by affection. Sense and Sensibility is a novel by Jane Austen, published in It was published . Marianne, still in misery over Willoughby's marriage, goes walking in the rain and becomes dangerously ill. .. The film Material Girls is a loose adaptation of the novel, based on a script by John Quaintance and directed by Martha.

sense and sensibility 2008 ending a relationship

Edward and Elinor marry, and later Marianne marries Colonel Brandon, having gradually come to love him. The two couples live as neighbours, with both sisters and husbands in harmony with each other.

Willoughby considers Marianne as his ideal but the narrator tells the reader not to suppose that he was never happy. She represents the "sense" half of Austen's title Sense and Sensibility. She is 19 years old at the beginning of the book. She becomes attached to Edward Ferrars, the brother-in-law of her elder half-brother, John. She sympathetically befriends Colonel Brandon, Marianne's long-suffering admirer and eventual husband.

Always feeling a keen sense of responsibility to her family and friends, she places their welfare and interests above her own and suppresses her own strong emotions in a way that leads others to think she is indifferent or cold-hearted. For example, even though she is extremely distressed upon learning of Lucy Steele's secret engagement to Edward, Elinor keeps Lucy's secret and does not reveal her discomfort with the information. While the book's narrative style is 3rd person omniscient, it is Elinor's viewpoint that is primarily reflected.

Thus, the description of most of the novel's characters and events reflects Elinor's thoughts and insights. Marianne Dashwood — the romantically inclined and eagerly expressive second daughter of Mr and Mrs Henry Dashwood. Her emotional excesses identify her as the "sensibility" half of Austen's title. She is 16 years old at the beginning of the book.

She is the object of the attentions of Colonel Brandon and Mr Willoughby. She is attracted to young, handsome, romantically spirited Willoughby and does not think much of the older, more reserved Colonel Brandon. Marianne undergoes the most development within the book, learning her sensibilities have been selfish.

The Jane Austen Film Club: Sense and Sensibility- vs

She decides her conduct should be more like that of her elder sister, Elinor. Edward Ferrars — the elder of Fanny Dashwood's two brothers.

sense and sensibility 2008 ending a relationship

He forms an attachment to Elinor Dashwood. Years before meeting the Dashwoods, Ferrars proposed to Lucy Steele, the niece of his tutor. The engagement has been kept secret owing to the expectation that Ferrars' family would object to his marrying Miss Steele. He is disowned by his mother on discovery of the engagement after refusing to give it up.

John Willoughby — a philandering nephew of a neighbour of the Middletons, a dashing figure who charms Marianne and shares her artistic and cultural sensibilities. It is generally presumed by many of their mutual acquaintances that he is engaged to marry Marianne partly due to her own overly familiar actions, i. He is also contrasted by Austen as being " He is 35 years old at the beginning of the book. He falls in love with Marianne at first sight, as she reminds him of his father's ward whom he had fallen in love with when he was young.

He is prevented from marrying the ward because his father was determined she marry his older brother. He was sent into the military abroad to be away from her, and while gone, the girl suffered numerous misfortunes—partly as a consequence of her unhappy marriage. She finally dies penniless and disgraced, and with a natural i. He is a very honourable friend to the Dashwoods, particularly Elinor, and offers Edward Ferrars a living after Edward is disowned by his mother.

sense and sensibility 2008 ending a relationship

Minor characters[ edit ] Henry Dashwood — a wealthy gentleman, man of sternness who dies at the beginning of the story. The terms of his estate — entailment to a male heir — prevent him from leaving anything to his second wife and their children. He asks John, his son by his first wife, to look after meaning ensure the financial security of his second wife and their three daughters.

Mrs Dashwood — the second wife of Henry Dashwood, who is left in difficult financial straits by the death of her husband. She is 40 years old at the beginning of the book. Much like her daughter Marianne, she is very emotive and often makes poor decisions based on emotion rather than reason. She is thirteen at the beginning of the book. She is also romantic and good-tempered but not expected to be as clever as her sisters when she grows older. John Dashwood — the son of Henry Dashwood by his first wife.

He intends to do well by his half-sisters, but he has a keen sense of avariceand is easily swayed by his wife. She is vain, selfish, and snobbish.

She spoils her son Harry. She is very harsh to her husband's half-sisters and stepmother, especially since she fears her brother Edward is attached to Elinor. Sir John Middleton — a distant relative of Mrs Dashwood who, after the death of Henry Dashwood, invites her and her three daughters to live in a cottage on his property.

Described as a wealthy, sporting man who served in the army with Colonel Brandon, he is very affable and keen to throw frequent parties, picnics, and other social gatherings to bring together the young people of their village. He and his mother-in-law, Mrs Jennings, make a jolly, teasing, and gossipy pair.

Lady Middleton — the genteel, but reserved wife of Sir John Middleton, she is quieter than her husband, and is primarily concerned with mothering her four spoiled children. A widow who has married off all her children, she spends most of her time visiting her daughters and their families, especially the Middletons.

She and her son-in-law, Sir John Middleton, take an active interest in the romantic affairs of the young people around them and seek to encourage suitable matches, often to the particular chagrin of Elinor and Marianne. Robert Ferrars — the younger brother of Edward Ferrars and Fanny Dashwood, he is most concerned about status, fashion, and his new barouche.

Double Wedding - Pride and Prejudice - BBC Studios

He subsequently marries Miss Lucy Steele after Edward is disinheritedbut whether he will remain his mother's heir since his brother was disinherited for having been engaged to Miss Lucy Steele in the first place is not revealed.

A bad-tempered, unsympathetic woman who embodies all the foibles demonstrated in Fanny and Robert's characteristics. She is determined that her sons should marry well. After having disowned her eldest son for his engagement to Lucy Steele, she probably also later disinherited her younger son for his marriage to the self-same girl. Charlotte Palmer — the daughter of Mrs Jennings and the younger sister of Lady Middleton, Mrs Palmer is jolly, but empty-headed, and laughs at inappropriate things, such as her husband's continual rudeness to her and to others.

Thomas Palmer — the husband of Charlotte Palmer who is running for a seat in Parliament, but is idle and often rude. He is considerate toward the Dashwood sisters. Lucy Steele — a young, distant relation of Mrs Jennings, who has for some time been secretly engaged to Edward Ferrars.

As an Austen addict whose obsession exceeds even that of the protagonist of my novel, my mind is so full of the text that often I must watch a new film adaptation twice just to see if I like it or not. The first time I watch, my mind is buzzing: Why did they add this scene or cut that one? Not exactly the uncluttered frame of mind one needs in order to sit back and enjoy the story unfolding on the screen.

But this new Sense and Sensibility? That called for three viewings before I could even see it as a film unto itself.

Sense and Sensibility - Confused about Marianne and Willoughby Showing of 38

Nevertheless, I'm happy to report that I find myself in a state of admiration for the new Sense and Sensibility. The luxury of this particular film's nearly three hours of screen time provides more opportunities to stay true to text, which we devotees of text certainly appreciate. However, this film, like most adaptations, includes expanded and even invented scenes, something I have no objection to, as long as they serve the story and character development.

Most important is that the new film, like its predecessor, captures the spirit of the book. It is the story of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, who represent the contrast and interplay between sense and sensibility. Elinor, the "sense" sister, feels deeply but would rather keep her pain to herself. She simply does not want to add to the grief of her newly widowed mother and highly wrought sister Marianne, the "sensibility" sister. But Austen's story is far more complex than a mere comparison of opposites, for neither sense nor sensibility can preserve either sister from heartbreak or from making incorrect assumptions about the man she loves.

sense and sensibility 2008 ending a relationship

The difference is in how each sister deals with her challenges. Marianne continually puts herself in harm's way by flaunting convention and taking dangerous risks that nearly cost her life as well as her reputation.

Elinor builds inner strength through service to those she loves and acceptance of what she cannot change.

There are several noteworthy ways in which the filmmakers stayed with and strayed from text. Consider, for example, this brief exchange in the novel between Colonel Brandon and Elinor, in which Colonel Brandon tells of a duel he had with Willoughby Vol. We returned unwounded, and the meeting, therefore, never got abroad. Even if a modern reader realizes that "meeting by appointment" means a duel, it's unlikely that he or she does more than sigh, like Elinor, over the violent manner by which some men settle their differences.

Besides, Jane would not have taken such cheap pot shots. Fast forward to life at Barton Cottage: Dashwood now must live on a pitiful income of pounds per year. This means serious economizing and downsizing for the ladies Dashwood. Frequent meals at Barton Park help to defray some expenses.

We meet Sir John Middleton and his brood, and his mother-in-law, Mrs. The Palmers were practically non-existent, however. A new viewer would have no concept of Mr. Lucy Steele, who came across as sweet and ditzy rather than manipulative, was given so little screen time that her marriage to Robert Ferrars must have come as a complete surprise to those who had not read the novel. However, to be fair to Andrew Davies, we are treated to a fine characterization of Miss Anne Steele, who as played by Daisy Haggard, nearly steals the show.

John Willoughby

In fact, her mother and sister look on approvingly as they watch the Colonel use a classic horse training technique of turning his back to Marianne to pique her interest. Davies, but women are not chattel and I was a bit put off by these scenes. We also see more of Colonel Brandon David Morrisseywho is given as much screen time as Willoughby. Her Elinor is stoic, restrained, and vulnerable.